Avatars vs Self (Ongoing project)

Avatars vs Self explores our relationship with the image we use in our daily communication with the world, either literally as an external image or as a profile picture or figuratively as a life attitude or as a treatment of ourselves as an avatar. How is this image affected by an automated everyday life consisting of dozens of ways of communication without any physical presence, and a series of code numbers that control this communication and always take precedence over image or even physical presence.
Identification through someone’s photo is less and less necessary. When nowadays there are so much data to substantiate that I am indeed me, how necessary is the image of my face as a documentation?
The expanded circle of acquaintances that pretty much everyone has, and of whom few really know each other except as friends on social media, as followers, or as an email contact, helps to weaken not only the physical presence but also the indirect presence of the other either through a camera or through a photo of themselves. Man, as a direct operator of the material world is not a self-evident condition. Everyone at some point has had to confirm that they’re not robots to get into a page or an account.
From our true image as a photo, and the insecurity of exposing the real self, to the absolute freedom of an avatar and a life in a virtual environment where everything is a customization. An alternative presentation of ourselves as an avatar creates a false sense of security in terms of safeguarding personal data. What each of us shows as a self-presentation, no longer matters. You can be as yourself 20 years ago, your dog or your cat, some “hero” you admire, or an idea you defend. You can be anything instead of you.

Avatars vs Self (Ongoing project)

Avatars vs Self explores our relationship with the image we use in our daily communication with the world, either literally as an external image or as a profile picture or figuratively as a life attitude or as a treatment of ourselves as an avatar. How is this image affected by an automated everyday life consisting of dozens of ways of communication without any physical presence, and a series of code numbers that control this communication and always take precedence over image or even physical presence.
Identification through someone’s photo is less and less necessary. When nowadays there are so much data to substantiate that I am indeed me, how necessary is the image of my face as a documentation?
The expanded circle of acquaintances that pretty much everyone has, and of whom few really know each other except as friends on social media, as followers, or as an email contact, helps to weaken not only the physical presence but also the indirect presence of the other either through a camera or through a photo of themselves. Man, as a direct operator of the material world is not a self-evident condition. Everyone at some point has had to confirm that they’re not robots to get into a page or an account.
From our true image as a photo, and the insecurity of exposing the real self, to the absolute freedom of an avatar and a life in a virtual environment where everything is a customization. An alternative presentation of ourselves as an avatar creates a false sense of security in terms of safeguarding personal data. What each of us shows as a self-presentation, no longer matters. You can be as yourself 20 years ago, your dog or your cat, some “hero” you admire, or an idea you defend. You can be anything instead of you.